Blue Angels Electric Composite

Contrary to rumors that I probably started, I’m still here. I know I have not posted any new images for quite some time. Sorry about that. But life has a habit of getting in the way via family, kids, work, chores, computer problems and a whole mess of other excuses I can make up.

So, to kick things off, I’ll start off with a composite I did late last year of an image I first posted back in 2011 of the Blue Angels display at the National Naval Aviation Museum. Add some clouds, a little motion blur and an electric style and things start jazzing up just a bit.

 

Blue Angels Electric Composite

The Aero L-39 Albatros

Half the reason I enjoy going to the Aeros and Autos show at Ellington Field in Houston, are the airplanes of course. My only complaint is that I wish there were more of them; plenty of awesome cars, just add a few more airplanes, please.

The Aero L-39 Albatros is a high-performance jet trainer aircraft developed in Czechoslovakia. More than 2,800 L-39s have served with over 30 air forces around the world and the Albatros is the most widely used jet trainer in the world.

This 1986 Aero L-39ZA Albatros is a great example and looks like it would be a blast to fly.

 

The L-39 Albatros is the most widely used jet trainer in the world. Photo by Tim Stanley

Lodestar Cockpit

This is a full view of the Lockheed Lodestar cockpit on the tarmac at Hobby Airport in Houston by the 1940 Air Terminal Museum. I took the creative license to give it a slightly dated look, by going all black and white. The actual airplane looks newer in color. It’s surprising how “old” something can look by just giving it a monotone treatment.

 

This is a full view of the Lockheed Lodestar cockpit on the tarmac at Hobby Airport in Houston by the 1940 Air Terminal Museum. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

 

Yellow Valiant

Late last summer I shared a photo called the Yellow Valiant Cowling. Since it’s been a few months, I figured you were chomping at the bit to see the rest of the airplane.

This Vultee BT-13 Valiant was at Hobby Airport in Houston attending a fly-in at the 1940 Air Terminal Museum. The Valiant was a World War II basic trainer aircraft built by Vultee Aircraft for the United States Army Air Corps and US Army Air Forces. It was later replaced by the popular AT-6.

I enjoyed it because it is such a simple design and beautifully restored.

This Vultee BT-13 Valiant was at Hobby Airport in Houston attending a fly-in at the 1940 Air Terminal Museum. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

The Demon and the Banshee

Jets are cool. Fighter jets are even cooler. The closet most people will ever get to one is on their TV screen. But at the National Naval Aviation Museum, you can get up close and personal.  They have one of the best collections of historic aircraft in one location that you can find. 

Here the F3H DEMON and behind it, the more successful F2H-4 BANSHEE are on display.

Here the F3H DEMON and behind it, the more successful F2H-4 BANSHEE are on display, at the National Naval Aviation Museum in Pensacola, Florida. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

 

Intruder on the Lexington

The A-6A Intruder flew from 1960 to 1997 carrying out its mission of close air support and tactical/strategic bombing.

The A-6E Intruder carried an impressive array of weapons and electronic devices.  The missions range from aerial refueling and close air support to tactical/strategic bombing, electronic counter measures, reconnaissance and SAM suppression.

This rugged and reliable aircraft was the first all weather, day or night, low level attack bomber and has set high standards that similar aircraft will be measured for generations to come.

This aircraft on the USS Lexington is on loan from the National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola, Florida.

 

This A6-E Intruder on the USS Lexington is on loan from the National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola, Florida. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Messerschmitt ME 262

I remember as a boy learning about this pioneer jet fighter. So imagine my delight when I saw one at the National Naval Aviation Museum. If it had been deployed a few years earlier, the battle of the skies in WWII could have gone very differently.

From Wikipedia

The Messerschmitt Me 262 was the world’s first operational jet-powered fighter aircraft. Design work started before World War II began, but engine problems prevented the aircraft from attaining operational status with the Luftwaffe until mid-1944. Compared with Allied fighters of its day, including the British jet-powered Gloster Meteor, it was much faster and better armed. But the Me 262 had a negligible impact on the course of the war as a result of its late introduction and the  small numbers that were deployed in operational service. The Me 262 influenced the designs of post-war aircraft such as theNorth American F-86 Sabre and Boeing B-47 Stratojet.

Messerschmitt Me 262