The Metairie Cemetery

For Halloween, I thought another black and white cemetery image might be in order. The Metairie Cemetery in New Orleans is like nothing I’ve ever seen before. While it might be the “norm” for folks in Louisiana, for this Texas boy, it was something from a different planet. Metairie Cemetery has the largest collection of elaborate marble tombs and funeral statuary in the city. What I didn’t realize was how many people they would place inside each tomb. Some of them were the size of small buildings and many were extremely elaborate and might contain a dozen or two people. There was definitely plenty of “old money” buried there.

The image below actually shows some of the more normal size tombs, containing maybe eight people, stacked four on each side. Those tombs in the center of the cemetery were much larger in comparison. I might post some of those in the coming weeks.

 

The Metairie Cemetery by Tim Stanley Photography.

St. Louis Cathedral at Dawn

It had been several hours of running around the French Quarter, creating images with a fun group of guys.  It was almost morning and the predawn light was pushing the dark away for the day. Though the streets were still empty, the morning rush hour was soon to start. This quiet moment at the St. Louis Cathedral in Jackson Square was one of my last shots before sitting down to beignets and coffee at Cafe Du Monde, which is open 24 hours a day.

That weekend with friends David Morefield, Jeremy Mancuso and Andy Crawford was about as much fun I have had taking photos since my trip to Europe. It was a great group of guys and a fun place to shoot. Andy wrote a great article on our trip if you want a feel for how a photo weekend photo trip might go. View my New Orleans gallery for other examples of where we went. 

 

 

This quiet moment at the St. Louis Cathedral in Jackson Square was one of my last shots before sitting down to beignets and coffee at Cafe Du Monde. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

French Quarter Hitching Post

In an era when automobiles rule the streets, it is a bit unusual to find streets lined with hitching posts. Such is the case in the French Quarter in New Orleans. However, here you will find horse-pulled carriages in this section of town, for the benefit of the tourists, that wish to travel the crowded streets in style for all to see. So it is not uncommon to find these French Quarter hitching posts on many of the blocks. Most are weathered, which only adds to the character of these street decorations.

 

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Loyola University New Orleans

One of the fun things about visiting a city with someone that has lived there before, are the things you get to see that you never knew about. Not because they are not worth knowing about, but simply because they were never on your radar. On our trip to New Orleans, my friend David Morefield and I went out late (how could you sleep, when there was a photo opportunity waiting somewhere) and we drove around with no particular destination in mind. We came upon Loyla University, thinking it was a church our friend Andy Crawford had shot earlier in the day. As it turned out, it wasn’t the same church, but it was still worth the stop.

It was around midnight, so we could not do much, but the Holy Name of Jesus Catholic Church on the left and Marquette Hall on the right, made for a very impressive main entrance. 

 
The Holy Name of Jesus Catholic Church on the left and Marquette Hall on the right, made for a very impressive main entrance to the Loyola University in New Orleans. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Inside Fort Macomb

While in New Orleans, we visited two Civil War forts, the second being Ft. Macomb. This site is not open to the public, but we were granted special permission by the Office of the Lieutenant Governor of the State of Louisiana for a morning photo shoot. The layout is very similar to Ft. Pike, just a few miles up the road.  Because Macomb is not currently open to the public though, it is not as manacured as Pike is. This did give it a bit more rustic look.

This scene is looking out from one of the perimeter tunnels, back towards the center of the fort. We want to thank the Louisiana Office of State Parks, the Louisiana Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism, and the State of Louisiana Office of the Lieutenant Governor for the opportunity to visit and photograph this seldom visited landmark.

 

This scene is looking out from one of the perimeter tunnels, back towards the center of the fort. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

The Tunnels of Fort Pike

I did not know what to expect before I visited Fort Pike, close to New Orleans. Knowing that it was built in the early 1800s, I did not expect guard towers and and high wooden walls. What I did see, however, was even better. An brick and earthen fort, with tunnels running through the exterior walls, allowing cannons or troops access to the enemy. It was very damp down there with even a few stalactites hanging from the ceiling in some spots.

 

Fort Pike is a brick and earthen fort, with tunnels running through the exterior walls, allowing cannons or troops access to the enemy. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

Battalion Barrel

While in New Orleans, we visited two Civil War forts, the first here being Ft. Pike. Ft. Pike, now open to the public, was built between 1819 and 1826 as a result of the War of 1812 to protect one of the main approaches to New Orleans. The fort, overlooking Rigolets Pass, was to defend against sea or land attack, though no cannon was ever fired from there. This scene is from inside one of the larger rooms in the central building.

 

While in New Orleans, we visited two Civil War forts, the first here being Ft. Pike.  Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.