Tropical Isle, NOLA Style

A tropical isle is a place of refuge and comfort in a large, vast ocean. In New Orleans, some might consider this establishment at the corner of Bourbon and Orleans streets in the French Quarter as a place of refuge and comfort too, if only for a short visit. I would not know though, as it was predawn when we toured the Quarter.

 

The Tropical Isle neon sign in the French Quarter in New Orleans, at Bourbon and Orleans streets.

Home of Jax

Looking over Jackson Square and Washington Artillery Park in the French Quarter of New Orleans, is the old Jackson Brewery, commonly known as Jax Brewery. Constructed in 1891, it became the central brewery for Jax Beer, which in the 1960s became the 10th-largest brewery in the country. The company owning the brewery later went bankrupt and in the 1980s the building was purchased and turned into space for shops and restaurants.

 

Looking over Jackson Square and Washington Artillery Park in the French Quarter of New Orleans, is the old Jackson Brewery.

The Metairie Cemetery

For Halloween, I thought another black and white cemetery image might be in order. The Metairie Cemetery in New Orleans is like nothing I’ve ever seen before. While it might be the “norm” for folks in Louisiana, for this Texas boy, it was something from a different planet. Metairie Cemetery has the largest collection of elaborate marble tombs and funeral statuary in the city. What I didn’t realize was how many people they would place inside each tomb. Some of them were the size of small buildings and many were extremely elaborate and might contain a dozen or two people. There was definitely plenty of “old money” buried there.

The image below actually shows some of the more normal size tombs, containing maybe eight people, stacked four on each side. Those tombs in the center of the cemetery were much larger in comparison. I might post some of those in the coming weeks.

 

The Metairie Cemetery by Tim Stanley Photography.

All That Jazz

In case you haven’t noticed, I’ve posted a few black and white photos this week. You can blame my friend Andy Crawford for that. Andy is a photographer that joined us in New Orleans last spring and is just a super guy. Earlier this week, he challenged me to a Five Day Black-and-White Photo Challenge. I’m not the biggest black-and-white photographer, so I had to come up with a couple of examples that might work. So for day three, I present this image of some street performers in the Bourbon Street area of the French Quarter in New Orleans. These young guys put on quite a show, and didn’t blink an eye when our group of photographers swarmed all around their “stage.”

 

Some street performers in the Bourbon Street area of the French Quarter in New Orleans. These young guys put on quite a show, and didn't blink an eye when our group of photographers swarmed all around their stage.

 

Bad Habits

What use to be socially acceptable years ago, is not any more. Watch any old black and white movie and you most likely will see someone lighting up with a smoke in one hand with an adult beverage in the other. These days, you might still find it, but most likely in an establishment just for that purpose. Some would state that a bad habit is only bad if taken to the extreme, so proceed with caution.

This was taken at Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop in the French Quarter in New Orleans.

 

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Bluegrass in the Big Easy

Walk through the French Quarter in New Orleans and you are bound to find street performers. Jazz is the predominate stye, but don’t be surprised to her everything from country to zydeco. This young lady and her banjo entertained many with her bluegrass arrangements. What surprised me was the quality of the performers. All the musicians we heard were really great performers. Most do not mind photographers shooting away, as long as you tip them well when you are done. I don’t shoot a lot of people photos, but I do enjoy environmental portraits; images of people in their workplace or doing something that gives a hint of their personality.

 

This young lady and her banjo entertained many with her bluegrass arrangements in the French Quarter. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.

St. Louis Cathedral at Dawn

It had been several hours of running around the French Quarter, creating images with a fun group of guys.  It was almost morning and the predawn light was pushing the dark away for the day. Though the streets were still empty, the morning rush hour was soon to start. This quiet moment at the St. Louis Cathedral in Jackson Square was one of my last shots before sitting down to beignets and coffee at Cafe Du Monde, which is open 24 hours a day.

That weekend with friends David Morefield, Jeremy Mancuso and Andy Crawford was about as much fun I have had taking photos since my trip to Europe. It was a great group of guys and a fun place to shoot. Andy wrote a great article on our trip if you want a feel for how a photo weekend photo trip might go. View my New Orleans gallery for other examples of where we went. 

 

 

This quiet moment at the St. Louis Cathedral in Jackson Square was one of my last shots before sitting down to beignets and coffee at Cafe Du Monde. Photo by Tim Stanley Photography.